Whitehorse was more urban and gritty than we expected. Our pressing need was to exchange our currency, but it was after 5 p.m. so we knew the banks would be closed. We stopped by the visitor centre and they suggested that we go to the MoneyMart. The MoneyMart was one of those people-in-cages cheque cashing places, but they pleasantly offered us some Canadian currency.

We drove to the Best Western Gold Rush Inn and rushed in. The lobby was full of people waiting to check in. There was no rush in the inn behind the counter. Waiting seemed even more interminable as we were in line behind a Harley rider who mentioned his need for a beer every other sentence. It was a relief to get our room key and escape to the fourth floor. Their elevator is painted like a safe, and required use of the room key to activate the elevator control panel. The fourth floor is very special because it is the only floor with air conditioner units.

The room was very modern and placid. We freshened up a bit and set out for a restaurant called The Cellar Steakhouse and Wine Bar. The street crossing signals in Whitehorse made all kind of noises: one chirped, one sounded a little like a cuckoo, one did a countdown, one sounded like a clock.

The Cellar proved to be a bit fancy and pricey, but it was worth it. Our waiter was amazing and made an excellent martini. We both had delicious prime rib dinners and even splurged on some dessert.

A waitress for another table lit the table's candle with a match and then attempted to smoothly wave it out and put it behind her back. She seemed a little startled when she brought her hand back around and realized that the match was still lit.

A couple sat down behind Chris, debating whether a third party would have remembered to set his watch ahead an hour or whether he had forgotten and would thus be very late. This third party, however, arrived on time and proved to be a large voluble man with a pronounced accent--Russian or perhaps German. He was full of humorous and fulsome comments and kept his table well amused.

Meanwhile, Chris was being very amusing at our table. At some point, just after Katherine had been reduced to giggles by one of Chris's bon mots, the man at the other table said something to his companions, began to laugh, and then turned completely around in his chair to look at Katherine with fresh laughter. We still have no idea why.